Artists

The many shades of Baroness

The many shades of Baroness

WITH THE release of their new album, Purple, the members of Baroness — John Baizley – vocals and guitar, Pete Adams – guitar and vocals, Nick Jost – bass and keyboards, and Sebastian Thomson – drums — find themselves fielding an endless list of media requests. Purple is, in many ways, a landmark album — it’s the band’s first time writing and recording with Jost and Thomson, their first with producer Dave Fridmann (Flaming Lips, Sleater-Kinney), their first on their own label, Abraxan Hymns, and of course their first since 2012’s horrific bus accident, which left permanent scars — physical and emotional — on the band, resulting in two members’ departures, and Jost and Thomson joining the group.  more...
John Jorgenson’s tuneful triad

John Jorgenson’s tuneful triad

While other artists release digital CDs and EPs, or sometimes singles in lieu of full-length discs, John Jorgenson has taken the road now much less traveled by releasing Divertuoso, a box set of new material. Three new albums, three distinct styles, three different groups of musicians, released at the same time. Even he admits that it is an unorthodox undertaking.  more...
Satriani on trees, concepts and fame

Satriani on trees, concepts and fame

IT’S AN enjoyable experience for some, a necessary evil for others, and the bane of many beginning musicians’ existence. Practice. It’s the punch line to the generations-old question, “How do you get to Carnegie Hall?” It’s also what Joe Satriani was doing prior to beginning a day of interviews. “It’s one of those discouraging facts,” he says. “When I was young, I always thought that I’d practice for a couple of years and then I’d be good, I’d be set, and I could just go and have fun. But decade after decade it’s like, ‘Man, I’ve got to keep practicing all the time; otherwise my fingers forget what they’re supposed to do and how hard it is to do it.’”  more...
Aloke, Linden, Division, DeCourcey

Aloke, Linden, Division, DeCourcey

DOWNTOWN Peekskill, New York, is busy for a Sunday morning. People are shuffling in and out of buildings, circling the block in search of parking while the police set to cornering off Division Street and its restaurant row for a nearby local art show and to be more pedestrian friendly for the coming lunch hour. Nestled among the eateries between Central Avenue and Main Street is Division Street Guitars, a venture that started out as a repair workshop, but soon evolved into a full-service guitar store.  more...
Rob Balducci gets personal

Rob Balducci gets personal

Playing guitar has always been an emotional experience for Rob Balducci, but perhaps never as much as on his latest release, 821 Monroe Drive. The album is named after his maternal grandparents’ house, where Balducci spent summers as a youngster and adolescent, and where he spent hours practicing the guitar. The new songs revisit those years, as Balducci recalls influences and memories, and shapes them into instrumental stories.  more...
A more aggressive Finger Eleven emerges…

A more aggressive Finger Eleven emerges…

CANADA’S Finger Eleven were on top of the world in 2007. Their album, Them Vs. You Vs. Me, spawned the mega hit ‘Paralyzer’ and won the group a Juno for Best Rock Album. The band’s follow-up, Life Turns Electric, dropped in the fall of 2010, and while it performed well in the band’s homeland, it flew under the radar in the US. Today, the band is back with Five Crooked Lines, a 12-track slab of aggression produced by Nashville-based audio wizard Dave Cobb (Rival Sons, Jason Isbell). So what prompted the Canadian quintet to get raw in Tennessee?  more...
Neil Giraldo: Nice guy meets maniac!

Neil Giraldo: Nice guy meets maniac!

Consistency. It’s what defines Neil Giraldo professionally and personally. He has it in his tone, his gear, his attitude, and his marriage. Onstage he swears by his main guitar — a 1968 Guild Starfire III that he calls Pain — and his Marshall JCM 900 amps, a chain that has defined his sound for decades. In his approach to life, he dedicates himself to being “a nice guy,” good to his fans, kind to others, and he centers himself through a dedicated regimen of exercise and proper nutrition. And, of course, there’s his 33-year marriage and 36-year working relationship with Pat Benatar — no small feat in an industry in which musicians change band members and partners as if walking through revolving doors.  more...